Tips,
Tricks, &
Tutorials
Knowledge is Power!

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Crafting should be a fun way to learn and grow, but sometimes we hit a snag and just need a bit of hand-holding to get us over the hurdle. I'll be adding pages to this section of YumiYarns.com that will help you gain new skills and expand your handmade horizons.

 

Check back often or just sign-up for my newsletter (at the bottom of the page) to be notified when I've added a new Tutorial.

Scroll through the list or click one of the buttons below to be taken to the type of tutorial that you're looking for.

 

This week I wanted to do a quick tutorial on how to do the German Twisted Cast-On (the cast-on that I recommend for my Giant Color Shift Brioche Scarf). This cast-on method is also known as the Old Norwegian Cast On and is wonderful for Brioche or any knitting where you want a super stretchy and elastic beginning to your project!

My Tagetes Shawlette begins with an I-Cord Tab Cast On, but it's slightly different than the usual one that's recommended for shawls. (I feel like this method is easier, but I may be biased.  ^_-  )

 

This tutorial will cover how I make my I-Cord Tab so that you don't have to pick up as many stitches as you're casting-on. The instructions listed below are easy to use for any other pattern that calls for an I-Cord Tab Cast On as well so it's a good technique to try out. You never know when a new skill will come in handy!

A Magic Ball in knitting/crochet is a ball or cake of yarn that is actually made up of several smaller skeins (usually leftovers, mini-skeins or samples). These yarns can be high-contrast, low-contrast, matchy-matchy, completely random, whatever your heart desires! (You can even play with making your own gradient skein by connecting colors that are just slightly different from one another.) These yarns can really be connected with any old knot (or your favorite form of splicing) but my preferred method is the Magic Knot.

 

The Magic Knot is a type of knot that is very small, solid and (best of all) reliable. It's almost imperceptible once the yarn is knit/crocheted and is an excellent choice when you're working a project where your ends won't stay put either due to the nature of the fabric or the nature of the yarn. You can even use it for superwash yarns & create your own self-striping sock yarn from your scraps if you'd like. I actually learned this technique years and years ago when I made jewelry, so it may be familiar to you once you see it laid out as well.

When working this cast-on, you are essentially making a crocheted chain around your knitting needle. This creates a row of workable knit stitches that can be taken out at a later point so that you can work the fabric in the opposite direction. It can also be used to graft live stitches to the cast-on stitches instead of using a traditional bind-off. This will create a seamless join between the two ends of the fabric.

I discovered this cast-on in Elizabeth Zimmermann's Knitter's Almanac when I was originally learning how to make a Pi Shawl. It's extremely useful & is very similar to the crocheted Magic Ring Cast-On that is often used to make stuffed crochet animals. This cast-on is essentially a loop that you crochet stitches around so that you can tighten the center as much as you like before weaving in the ends of your project. This gives a beautiful closed center to your project without having a gaping hole or an awkward puckering that distort's your fabric.

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Knitting Skills

This tutorial covers a quick and easy way to add beads to your knitting projects with a small crochet hook as you knit. No pre-stringing, no messing with floss, just a simple technique with the perfect tool. I've posted the video below along with supplies used and written instructions.

A painless step-by-step photo tutorial for working 2-Color Reversible Brioche Decreases that look beautiful from every angle.

In this tutorial I'll be showing you how to knit the 3 into 9 TBL (through the back loop) knitting stitch. This is a stitch that apears in Estonian Lace knitting patterns as well as just Lace Knitting patterns in general & is a way of adding 6 stitches by increasing from 3 to 9 stitches quickly while adding a decorative element to the project. It can be a bit tricky to understand what is going on when just reading through written instructions for this technique so I wanted to do a photo tutorial to try and show how simple this technique really is.

There are multiple variations on this technique that can include anything from 1 into 3 (also seen written as "k1, yo, k1 into the same st") to 5 into 15 and beyond. It's a fun way to play with increases & shaping in a pattern & is worth taking a stab at if you're curious. The important thing to note if you're playing around with it is that you need to end with an odd number of sts because you need to "trap" the final yarn-over with a knit stitch.

This is a quick and painless photo tutorial for the basic stitches that make brioche knitting unique: Brioche Knit (Brk), Brioche Purl (Brp), & Slip 1, Yarn Over (Sl1yo).

If brioche knitting is new to you or if you’ve been brioching like a champ for years, there’s always something new to learn. Here are a few tips that might make things a bit easier: 

Cables aren't hard!

 

They look complicated, but you're really just knitting the stitches out of order. It's just knitting, with a twist.

 

This tutorial goes over Right and Left 2/2 Cables, but the same techniques can be used for larger cables as well. A 2/2 Cable uses 4 stitches total, 2 are slipped onto a Cable Needle (CN) and held to the front or the back (depending on which direction the cable is going) while you work the next 2 stitches. The 2 held stitches are then worked either from the CN or they are slipped onto the left knitting needle and then worked. (See, we used a total of 4 stitches.) To make a 5/5 Cable, you would be using a total of 10 stitches with this same technique. Just follow what your pattern tells you and you'll be fine.

How often have you fiddled with a cable needle while working on a project in the car or in a waiting room only to drop the cable needle somewhere (usually in the abyss between the seat and the center console) and never find it again? Never fear, after this tutorial, you'll be able to happily knit that beautiful cabled pattern without the use of a cable needle. All it takes is faith that you can do it and just a bit of focus while you're learning.

In this tutorial I'll be showing you how to knit the Daisy Stitch that is featured in my English Garden Wrap. It's worked on the wrong-side rows & is a lot more simple than it seems. Plus, it's a pretty addictive stitch & when worked on larger needles can form a great lacey texture without being too fiddly.

I ran a live version of this tutorial on Saturday, November 24th @ 3 PM CST, thank you to everyone who joined in!

Join me over on Instagram every Saturday at 3 PM CST for live tutorials & for a short Q&A session afterwards. If you can't make the live event, make sure to sign up for my emails at the bottom of this page so that I can send you the link for the replay after the event ends.

This stitch is a simple way to create a faux-lace that also lends a bit of a geometric pattern to your work. It'll also burn through your yarn and give you the length of knitting more rows than you actually have so if you need some instant gratification, comfort knitting, this is your stitch!

The Knit 2 Together (K2tog) stitch is a simple right-leaning knitted decrease that will take you from 2 stitches down to 1 stitch (1 stitch decreased).

Ready to try color-work, but not quite ready to manage 2 or more yarns as once?

Here are my top 5 tips for mosaic (slip-stitch) color-work knitting.

This is the second of 4 ways to make a pair of Twisted Stitches in Mosaic knitting. You can also think of them as 2 color, 1/1 cables without a cable needle. They sound much more complicated than they actually are and are really fun to work once you get a rhythm going. This tutorial uses 2 stitches (1 in each color) and will teach you how to make the color in the foreground (the pink) lean to the left when you are working a Right Side row.

This is the fourth of 4 ways to make a pair of Twisted Stitches in Mosaic knitting. You can also think of them as 2 color, 1/1 cables without a cable needle. They sound much more complicated than they actually are and are really fun to work once you get a rhythm going. This tutorial uses 2 stitches (1 in each color) and will teach you how to make the color in the foreground (the pink) lean to the left when you are working a Wrong Side row.